Bhutan

Economics of land degradation and improvement in Bhutan
Nkonya, Ephraim M.; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Anderson, Weston; Kato, Edward. 2016

Collection: /p15738coll5
Series:
Record type: Book chapter
Keywords: sustainable land management; hydroelectric power; sediment
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19168-3_12
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19168-3_12
DOIA: 10.1007/978-3-319-19168-3_12
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI4; CRP2; A Ensuring Sustainable food production; D Transforming Agriculture; E Building Resilience; Land Resource Management for Poverty Reduction
Date created: 2015-11-20
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0001-9348-6561; 0000-0001-8159-1057
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll5/id/5100/filename/5100.pdf/mapsto/pdf
DOI : 10.1007/978-3-319-19168-3_12
2015 Nutrition country profile: Bhutan
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington, DC 2015

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series: Global Nutrition Report
Record type: Factsheet
Keywords: nutrition; malnutrition; nutrition policies; anemia; stunting; obesity; overweight; diabetes; children; micronutrients; health; climate change; private sector; agricultural development; agricultural policies; economic development; sustainability; food systems; breast feeding; indicators
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; CRP4; B Promoting healthy food systems
Date created: 2015-12-11
Subtitle:
orcida:
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129886/filename/129886.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

The 193 individual country profiles capture the status and progress of all UN Member States, and the 80+ indicators include a wealth of information on child, adolescent and adult anthropometry and nutritional status, in addition to intervention coverage, food supply, economics, and demography. This tool is particularly useful for nutrition champions at the country-level, as it presents a wide range of evidence needed to assess country progress in improving nutrition and nutrition-related outcomes.
Assessing the economic benefits of sustainable land management practices in Bhutan
Nkonya, Ephraim M.; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Anderson, Weston; Kato, Edward. Washington, D.C. 2014

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series: IFPRI Discussion Paper No.: 1361
Record type: Discussion paper
Keywords: Land management; Land degradation; Soil fertility; Sustainability; Hydroelectric power; Land use
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; A.2 Sustainable Natural Resource Policies; CRP2; CRP5; Land Resource Management for Poverty Reduction
Date created: 2014-08-04
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0001-8159-1057; 0000-0001-9348-6561
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/128241/filename/128241.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

This study was conducted with the objective of determining the returns to sustainable land management (SLM) at the national level in Bhutan. The study first uses satellite data on land change (Landsat) to examine land use change in 1990–2010 and its impact on sediment loading in hydroelectric power plants. The study then uses the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to analyze the impact of land use change and land management on sediment loading. The results from the land use change and SWAT analyses are used to assess the economic benefits of SLM.
2014 Nutrition country profile: Bhutan
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington, D.C. 2014

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Factsheet
Keywords: Nutrition; Poverty; Stunting; Children; malnutrition; Micronutrients; Mortality; Nutrition policies; Indicators; Food supply; Anemia; Birth weight; Breast feeding
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA;
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; CRP4; B Promoting healthy food systems
Date created: 2014-11-25
Subtitle:
orcida:
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/128602/filename/128602.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Agricultural commercialization and diversification in Bhutan
Pradhan, Kailash; Dewina, Reno; Minten, Bart. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Project Note
Keywords:
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1
Date created: 2011-09-23
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0002-2183-1845;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/124804/filename/124804.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

Bhutan has been characterized by good economic growth (9% annually) in the 9th Five-Year Plan (2002-2007) and is further continuing on this growth path. As domestic incomes rise because of this growth, Bhutanese consumers are expected to shift their consumption patterns from staple grains to fruits, vegetables, dairy, eggs, and meat, leading to an increase in demand for these high-value agricultural products.
Agricultural trade in Bhutan: Patterns, trends; and economic impact
Dem, Phub; Minot, Nicholas. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Report
Keywords: trade; exports; imports; rice; maize; fruits
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; Capacity Strengthening
Date created: 2015-05-07
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0001-9657-0427;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129183/filename/129183.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

In spite of its remote and land-locked location, Bhutan has been relatively successful as an agricultural exporter. The value of agricultural exports has grown at an annual rate of almost 9% since 2000. Taking advantage of the cooler climate, Bhutan exports oranges, potatoes, vegetables, and apples to India and Bangladesh. At the same time, agricultural imports have been growing at 10% per year. Rice accounts for more than two-thirds of the value of agricultural imports, which is not surprising given that Bhutan depends on imports for about half of its consumption needs. Wheat, vegetables, fruits, and spices are also imported. A key question, however, is whether this trade in agricultural products is beneficial to Bhutan in general and to poor farmers and consumers in particular?
An analysis of household food demand in Bhutan
Minten, Bart; Dukpa, Chencho. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Report
Keywords: prices; income; economic growth; households; food consumption; demand; supply;
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; Capacity Strengthening
Date created: 2015-05-07
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0002-2183-1845;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129184/filename/129184.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

Changes in prices and income, due to shocks or economic growth and reform, influence the overall and food consumption levels of poor households. However, it is often not clear to what extent they are affected by these factors and what interventions might be needed to help them. The reaction of households to such price and income changes can be predicted and quantified through economic parameters that are called ‘demand elasticities’. These demand elasticities are important to know for those stakeholders who want to anticipate and alleviate the negative impact on the economy as a whole and on vulnerable households in particular.
Agricultural commercialization and diversification in Bhutan
Minten, Bart; Pradhan, Kailash. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Report
Keywords: economic growth; diet; agricultural growth; food consumption
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; Capacity Strengthening
Date created: 2015-05-07
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0002-2183-1845;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129185/filename/129185.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

Bhutan has shown good economic growth (9% annually) in the 9th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2002-2007) and is further continuing on this growth path in the 10th FYP. As domestic incomes rise because of this growth, Bhutanese consumers are expected to shift their consumption patterns from staple grains to fruits, vegetables, dairy, eggs, and meat, leading to an increase in demand for these high-value agricultural products. Likewise, as Bhutan becomes integrated into the regional and global economy, farmers will diversify into high-value agricultural products that are in demand in urban areas of its South-Asian neighbors and in highincome countries. This is particularly true since, within South-Asia, Bhutan has a comparative advantage in temperate and sub-tropical commodities.
Technology adoption, agricultural productivity, and road infrastructure in Bhutan
Minten, Bart; Dukpa, Chencho. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Report
Keywords: productivity; food security; agricultural policies; economic development; agricultural sector; infrastructure; markets; food availability; technology adoption;
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; Capacity Strengthening
Date created: 2015-05-07
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0002-2183-1845;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129186/filename/129186.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

Agricultural productivity increases are one of the desired outcomes from sensible food security and agricultural policies. Increased productivity might lead to improved welfare of rural populations through several pathways. First, increased productivity ensures higher food availability and higher incomes at the farm household level. Second, increased food availability leads to lower prices of agricultural products and higher real wages, to the benefit of poor net buyers and wage laborers respectively. Third, a well-performing agricultural sector has important economic multiplier effects on the vibrancy of the off-farm rural economy. However, policy makers are often hampered by a lack of information on agricultural productivity, the constraints that farmers face, and the levers that they can use to improve productivity.
Food security and food self sufficiency in Bhutan
Minot, Nicholas; Pelijor, Nidup. Washington, D.C. 2010

Collection: /p15738coll2
Series:
Record type: Report
Keywords: food security; food production; agricultural development; agricultural policies; rice; maize; cereals
Countries: BHUTAN; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA
Language: English
Dataset files:
DOI:
DOIA:
IFPRI descriptor: IFPRI1; Capacity Strengthening
Date created: 2015-05-07
Subtitle:
orcida: 0000-0001-9657-0427;
Resource URL: http://ebrary.ifpri.org/utils/getdownloaditem/collection/p15738coll2/id/129187/filename/129187.pdf/mapsto/pdf
Abstract | View

Food security is defined as “the access for all people at all times to enough food for a health, active life” (FAO, 1996). In contrast, food self-sufficiency is defined as being able to meet consumption needs (particularly for staple food crops) from own production rather than by buying or importing. There is a long-standing debate on whether food self-sufficiency is a useful strategy to achieve food security. Supporters of this proposition argue that relying on the market for to meet food needs is a risky strategy because of volatility in food prices and possible interruption in supplies. The opposing view is that it is costly for a household (or country) to focus on food self-sufficiency rather than producing according to its comparative advantage and purchasing some of its food requirements from the market. This debate is reflected in the evolution of food policy in Bhutan. Early Five-Year Plans (FYPs) called for self-sufficiency in staple foods, while more recent FYPs focus on the goal of food security. This paper examines three questions related to food security and food self-sufficiency in Bhutan.

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